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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
prepare for defense against the threat to u.s. territory because of this coming capability, i think china is going to say, that's unacceptable. i'm hopeful. but at the end of the day as i say, the united states can't sit there waiting just for china. we have to be working with our allies on a comprehensive strategy, again, trying to let the region know that we want to be that important security guarantor. we also want to be a major trader, investor to the region and with asia-pacific. and for the stability and that trade and investment, and for prosperity and liberty to take root in this entry, any dynamic century with a rising asia pacific, it's going to have to take greater stability than north korea is right now letting it have. so for those initial comments, i will turn it back to our chairman. >> well, thank you, patrick the as always, very comprehensive argument. the floor is open. before we open the floor -- [inaudible] >> i want to pick up on patrick's point, and elaborate on what i see as the elephant in the room, which is china. outgoing defense secretary panetta told the house
. if somebody applied in the, to the mexico city u.s. embassy in january of 2007, and someone else crossed the border and is here in january of 2008, we all agree that the person who waited in line in 2007 should be able to get that green card before the person in 2008. we have to figure out how to do that so it's not an interminalably long period of time, that people are old or dead before they become. at the same time we have to make sure that this principle is kept because that helps us pass a bill. one other point i would make. we made two exceptions to that. dick durbin worked very hard on the dream act. we all agreed that should get special priority. >> young people born here as children? >> yeah. second we'll need something special for agriculture because it is a different situation. virtually whether you're in new york dairy country or arizona ranching country you can't get americans to do this kind of work. >> we're about to get the hook. my penultimate question, senator mccain, have you talked to speaker boehner about this? >> no but i did hear this statement a couple days ago wh
that. of their inventions by the way are doing just fine. in fact in 2012, u.s. global data traffic reached 207 bytes per month. a 62% increase over the previous year to the growth in the context processing to wonder seven bytes per month is the equivalent of watching 52 million dvds per month or sending 570 million text messages each second over our wireless networks and mobile usage will only continue to surge well into the future. its estimate of the mobile data tracking will grown ninefold in the next five years. furthermore, wireless devices are proliferating at an unprecedented rate. 51 million new devices are connected to the mobile networks in the last year alone bringing the total of american mobile enabled devices to 424 million roughly. it is estimated that 775 million wirelessly connected devices will be used by americans by the year 2017. to relieve the congested networks there to move wireless data to the unlicensed systems. last year 96% of the u.s. traffic associated with the devices was carried on the wi-fi network's at some point. not only does this percentage incl
the u.s. patent office issued patent number 46,454. i will give you a pop quiz. it was simply labeled john deere plow. but the implement sketched out on the page could just as easily been labeled, as some historians have named it, one of the most important inventions in american history. they called it the plow that broke the plains, and it did. by replacing cast-iron with smooth steel, john deere's innovation opened up huge new swaths of land for cultivation. it made it possible for towns like aberdeen south dakota my hometown to exist. before it killing and maker took a grown man a full 24 hours. after it, it took as little as five. and every pile of soil overturned upended another assumption about what the land could produce. that, to my mind, has been the story, not just of agricultural success, but of national success. and, indeed, of global progress. this kind of game changing innovation has enabled us to leap ahead, to break the points, to increase harvest, and to frankly, feed the whole world. sometimes innovations come from the most advanced science, other times they
commander of u.s. forces in iraq general loy austin to lead the command which is responsible for operations of middle east and afghanistan. general austin was joined by u.s. command nominee general david rodriguez who is a top commander in afghanistan from 2007 to 2011. this hearing is chaired by carl levin of michigan. it is two hours. >> good morning everybody and welcome this morning that committee considers the nomination of two very distinguished officers to the two of the most active and challenging combatant commands. general lloyd austin united states army nominated to the commander u.s. central command, and general david rodriquez, u.s. army to be nominated to be commander of the u.s. africa command. fees' to combat and commands, centcom and africom are the centers of gravity for the military's operations to counter the threat of terrorism. both nominees have served the country with distinction, and i want to faint each of you for your decades of military service and a willingness to serve once again. i and stand general austin's life and rodriguez's life are with us this morning.
'm looking forward to working with the ranking member ron barber as we both share a strong commitment to u.s. border security and ensuring our border agents receive the support that they need to protect the homeland. last september, ron and i attended the dedication ceremony of the bryant a kerry border patrol station in arizona on wrangled patrol agent brian terry who was killed in december 2010 in the line of duty in arizona. also look forward to a strong bipartisan cooperation in helping to make the department of homeland security as efficient and effective as possible. i would also like to introduce our new freshman majority members. today we have mr. kief rothfuss from pennsylvania and mr. richard hudson of north carolina, and later joining us will be mr. steven gaines of montana. they bring a wealth of experience to their new roles in the congress and on the subcommittee at a look forward to leveraging their experience and knowledge to provide effective oversight of dhs. let me pause for just a minute and think the subcommittee staff who have worked diligently to put this first hearing
. lowering the direct cost of energy is key to helping the u.s. economy recover and prosper. absolutely key. next is clean. as we attempt to minimize indirect costs or the externalities by driving up these prices -- again, i would suggest that this is a policy that's doomed to economic and practical failure. instead, we have to be aware of the impacts of every type of energy and make rational, informed decisions on what is acceptable, what needs to be mitigated, how do we do just that. our challenge here is to reduce the cost of cleaner sources of energy, not raise the cost of existing sources. and when we talk about clean, what we've tried to do in this report is to give it some definition here. too often "clean" is treated as an absolute. but i would contend that it is better regarded as a comparison. a better definition of clean in my view and what we have used in this report is less intensive in global lifestyle impacts than its likeliest alternative. so just consider that. less global -- less intensive in global lifestyle impacts. so next, diversity. every type of energy clearly has it
as u.s. story ?o are, is to -- senator, is to visit our courthouses where immigration and naturalization ceremonies take place. those ceremonies are profoundly inspiring because they come, new citizens, people about to become citizens, with their families. it is a day of joy and pride unmatched, and unexcelled in their lives. they come with friends and they come to celebrate with their friends and families. with tears in their eyes and their hearts and their throats, and there is no time that i have seen one of these ceremonies when i haven't been deeply moved and uplifted. if you ever have a down day, if you ever are discouraged about this nation, see one of these ceremonies. you will know what it means to be a citizen of the united states of america and how important it is and how important we should hard it. so i -- should regard it. so i approach immigration reform with appreciation of its importance to people who seek liberty and justice in this great land but also how we are enriched as a nation of immigrants by the diversity, the talent, the dedication they brin
nuclear weapons in the middle east and the decrease of u.s. influence in the region. then in about half an hour we're live with the closing session of the national governors' association's annual winter meeting as tv's dr. oz speaks to the group on government responsibility for the personal wellbeing of its citizens. and later the senate returns at 2 p.m. eastern following its weeklong presidents' day recess when new hampshire senator, kelly ayotte, delivers the annual reading of president george washington's 1796 of farewell address. >>> also today on the c pan networks, the bipartisan policy center's housing commission releases its recommendations for future federal policy. it's expected to address summits including -- subjects including housing finance and affordable rent. the report is being released by former senate majority leader george mitchell, former hud secretaries mel martinez and henry cisneros, and former missouri governor and senator kit bond. live coverage from the newseum in washington begins at 11 a.m. eastern over on c-span. >> on route 66, you know, people were trave
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)